Now In Audio: How Long Will South Africa Survive?

Three and a half decades after his book with the same title predicted the fall of Apartheid by the mid 1990s, Rhodes Scholar, Oxford don, political scientist and historian RW Johnson answers the same pressing question with similarly direct conclusions. Listen now to this brutal expose' of an economy mismanaged and plundered to the point of bankruptcy by its Soviet-style political masters. If this bestseller were prescribed reading for every South African, its contents would spark a revolution.

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RW Johnson’s Masterpiece Explains:

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Zuma's Chieftainship


How Jacob Zuma positioned himself, his family, confidants and long-time funders as regal overlords, first corrupting their home province of KwaZulu-Natal and then all of South Africa.

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Zuma's Associates


The financial and other bargains Zuma made in his ascension to the Presidency, making him beholden to a range of dubious “business associates” who, like medieval Barons, have been given licence to plunder within their own spheres of influence.

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BRICS Miscalculation


How Zuma and his acolytes horribly miscalculated South Africa’s membership role in BRICS, believing a ridiculous assumption the country was joining a grouping of “equals” and that China would financially support the country – and pour money into Africa.

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Trade Union Cave-in


That the ANC’s continuous caving-in to public service trade unions has resulted in a bloating of salaries taking them to 45% above equivalents in the private sector – and a doubling of the State’s wage bill in just five years.

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Soviet-Style Socialism


Why the application of economic policies which mirror the worst of the USSR were applied in South Africa and how the dogma of “socialism in one country” with its anti-business approach is destroying the tax base and instigating a capital strike by corporates.

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Destructive State Finances


That State finances are caught in destructive jaws of rising costs and sliding tax receipts, which means South Africa will soon be faced with one of two choices – following the ruinous path of Zimbabwe where GDP per capita is lower than it was in 1965; or accept tough terms that are certain to be imposed on an IMF bailout.

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Read by Alec Hogg

R W Johnson

The Future of South Africa

Endorsements of the Book

Well-written and well argued, his book is at its best describing the eye-watering corruption, nepotism and gang-violence that seem to link powerful officials in Zuma’s home province of KwaZulu-Natal to the wider ANC. … That South Africa’s black leaders appear to have fulfilled the worst predictions of their white supremacist predecessors makes uncomfortable reading. What surprises Johnson is how quickly they managed to do it.

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The Times (London)

An immensely readable and disturbing book. Let us pray that his prophecies are this time mistaken. …Ten years ago, Johnson would have been crucified for saying such things, but How Long? was greeted by an ominous silence in South Africa, making its way on to local bestseller lists without any review attention, not even attacks from Johnson’s enemies. It seems even they are reconciled to the fact that Johnson is right again: South Africa is in crisis.

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Rian Malan

The Spectator

Johnson’s newest book speaks to the corruption that now riddles the country’s body politic. As a result, it is increasingly up to the country’s politicians, economic and business leaders and others to explain how they, if they were in charge, would arrest the decay and reverse the process. The country clearly wants to hear such things and is increasingly hungry for solid answers.

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Daily Maverick

In 1977, Johnson was taking stock of where the apartheid state stood in relation to its likely end, and his prediction was more-or-less correct: 15 years later, it was officially dead, and South Africa had a new, democratically elected government. In the new nostradamic book, Johnson seems to be talking about a similar time frame, perhaps shortened to a decade or so, but in interviews he has given a much shorter period until we hit the wall, saying South Africa has a mere two years before it has to go begging to the International Monetary Fund for a bail-out. … Johnson has a great polemical gift … punchy

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Mail and Guardian

Audiobook Price


Only $19.99


About The Author

RW Johnson

R W Johnson


RW “Bill” Johnson is a 72 year old South African with anti-Apartheid roots who left the country for Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship in 1964. He stayed on to teach political science and sociology as an Emeritus Fellow at the university’s Magdalen College. Among his former students are three members of the current British cabinet and an editor of The Economist. Johnson has written 12 books, including the prescient 1977 version of How Long Will South Africa Survive, which projected the Apartheid regime would collapse in the mid 1990s. He returned to South Africa once the “great change” took place in 1990-94 to see first-hand had how it would all work out. He lives in Cape Town. For the past year the updated edition of How Long Will South Africa Survive has been the best selling non-fiction book in the country.

About The Reader

RW Johnson

Alec Hogg


Alec Hogg is the founder and publisher of Biznews.com. A writer, broadcaster and media entrepreneur, he was the overall winner of the Sanlam Financial Reporter of the Year in 1982, aged 23. Thirty years later he was honoured by the Sanlam competition judges with a Lifetime Achiever’s Award for his introduction of business radio to SA and his creation, in 1997, of Moneyweb, an online publishing pioneer and one of the few dot.com survivors. Its shares are still listed on the JSE. Hogg no longer owns any shares in that business.

He left Moneyweb in October 2012 and now focuses full-time on Biznews.com which he founded in August 2013.